What Happy Moms Do that Unhappy Moms Don't!

               

My mission is to help working moms who suffer from anxiety and self-doubts, don’t know how to help their children succeed or build a loving relationship with their partners.

From an aspiring actress to working for airline executives to becoming a pharmacy professor and a multigenre author, I have transformed my life while balancing the role of a working mother. My book The Art of Good Enough: The Working Mom’s Guilt-Free Guide to Thriving While Being Perfectly Imperfect has been featured on MSNBC, PBS, ABC, Fox, CBS, CW, Telemundo, Thrive Global, Working Mother magazine, and The Times of India.

As a mom of a teenager, I too experienced the worries, doubts, and lack of time that make many moms feel inadequate to change their lives around. These two unique approaches helped me and other women take control of our lives:

  1. Self-analysis: to understand the root cause of their problems.
  2. Reverse engineering: to map out the action plan from ‘where they want to be’ to ‘where they are now.’

I help working moms through my books, online courses, workshops, coaching, and speaking so they know the exact steps to build confidence in their abilities to care and support their children and partners.

Dr. Ivy Ge, author, professor
anxiety and stress
creative parenting

THE SECRET TO LIVING YOUR BEST LIFE IS TO FOCUS ON YOUR STRENGTHS, NOT YOUR WEAKNESSES

Interested in study findings on positive psychology, emotional, physical health, and aging, ideas to boost productivity and creativity, mind hacks to de-stress, and three-minute inside out makeover to get you through the day brilliantly?

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I’ll Always Carry You

Book description by author Linda L. Franklin, available on Amazon in August, 2019 I’ll Always Carry You: A Mother’s Story of Adoption Loss, Grief, and Healing   Nothing can break the bond between a mother and her child. When young Linda finds herself pregnant and abandoned by her baby’s father and her family, she retreats to an unwed mothers’ home to give birth. “You’ll never see him again,” they told her as they took him away for adoption. For three and a half decades they were right. “You’ll forget and go on as if it never happened,” they promised. Time passes, Linda marries, has two more sons and becomes a psychological therapist. But when her youngest asks a life-changing question, she realizes no mother forgets her baby. In this powerful true story, Linda reveals her intensely personal experience in stepping through the door of her locked-away past. She revisits the era before the sexual revolution that today seems hard to believe, when the culture of the ‘50’s and early ‘60’s demanded girls like her redeem their shame by giving away their babies. Along the way, the grief she’s buried in order to survive her traumatic separation explodes, refusing to be silenced any longer. Her body has never forgotten what she tried to erase from her mind. As Linda embarks on her journey to reconnect with lost family, she knows she must have the courage to face her pain in order to heal the broken young woman left behind the wall of shame and secrecy.  

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Optimize Your Time

Try It For Yourself There are three ways to do this. 1. Timesaving a) Lumping similar activities together saves not only time but also gas. For example, I mentioned grouping grocery shopping with mailing cards on one trip earlier. With the oil price at $4.50 per gallon, every extra mile we drive is money that could be saved. b) Summarize your findings or conclusion in words right after the completion of the day’s task. Don’t type on your phone or laptop, write them down in a notebook and date the entry. Writing triggers brain signals that promote memorization. This is great for large projects that take a long time to complete, saving you the frustration of digging through your old files to find out where you left off. School kids should try this method, as it’ll make their lives so much easier when preparing for the exams. 2. Minimize distractions a) Schedule a time slot for checking emails and web browsing. Turn your device off once outside of the allowed time. You might experience withdrawal symptoms, such as excessive worries that something terrible might happen while you are “offline.” Don’t panic, no one has died over this. You’ll live. b) Set a timer for intense work, then relax once the time is up. This way you’re always at the top of your productivity chart. 3. Breakdown a complex task into mini steps and get them done during your idle time.I usually schedule my son, Ethan’s appointments on the same day with mine so I can get everything done on one trip to the medical office. While we wait for the appointment, I’ll be answering emails, and Ethan’ll be doing his homework. Don’t underestimate the 15 or 20 minutes here and there, it adds up.When Ethan was in middle school, the campus opens late on Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. Since he usually arrives around 7:50 a.m., I checked out books he liked from the library and asked him to read while he waits for the school to start. For the three years he studied there, he finished about ten books just by optimizing the wait time! Want to see how much more you can do by using the few minutes here and there every day? Subscribe

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Time Management
Ivy Ge

Optimize Your Time

There are three ways to do this. 1. Timesaving a) Lumping similar activities together saves not only time but also gas. For example, I mentioned grouping grocery shopping with mailing cards on one trip earlier. With the oil price at $4.50 per gallon, every extra mile we drive is money that could be saved. b) Summarize your findings or conclusion in words right after the completion of the day’s task. Don’t type on your phone or laptop, write them down in a notebook and date the entry. Writing triggers brain signals that promote memorization. This is great for large projects that take a long time to complete, saving you the frustration of digging through your old files to find out where you left off. School kids should try this method, as it’ll make their lives so much easier when preparing for the exams. 2. Minimize distractions a) Schedule a time slot for checking emails and web browsing. Turn your device off once outside of the allowed time. You might experience withdrawal symptoms, such as excessive worries that something terrible might happen while you are “offline.” Don’t panic, no one has died over this. You’ll live. b) Set a timer for intense work, then relax once the time is up. This way you’re always at the top of your productivity chart. 3. Breakdown a task into mini steps and get them done during your idle time. I usually schedule my son, Ethan’s appointments on the same day with mine so I can get everything done on one trip to the medical office. While we wait for the appointment, I’ll be answering emails, and Ethan’ll be doing his homework. Don’t underestimate the 15 or 20 minutes here and there, it adds up. When Ethan was in middle school, the campus opens late on Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. Since he usually arrives around 7:50 a.m., I checked out books he liked from the library and asked him to read while he waits for the school to start. For the three years he studied there, he finished about ten books just by optimizing the wait time! Want to try and see how much more you can do by utilizing the few minutes here and there every day?

Read More »